Anonymous Romanesque, Christ blessing and the Saints Giles and Eutropius

Anonymous Romanesque,
Christ blessing and the Saints Giles and Eutropius

Anonymous Romanesque, Christ blessing and the Saints Giles and Eutropius
Limestone, 49X103x12 cm, Inv. n. 49

The inscription on the edge is dated 1127. This work depicts Christ the Redeemer in the centre blessing with his right hand, with the index and middle fingers extended. With his left hand he is holding the Gospels opened to a page reading Ego sum lux vera, or two excerpts from the Gospel of St. John.

To the sides of the Redeemer are two sculpted figures identified by Francesco Lanzoni, who in 1910 documented the discovery of the stone, as Saints Giles the Abbot and Eutropius Bishop. To the side of St. Giles is a hind because, as the Golden Legend (Leggenda Aurea) narrates, he was nourished by her milk during his hermitage.

The sculpted figures are corpulent and massive; with large hands, wide faces, crude noses, and thick and heavy wavy hair. These are characteristics of Romanesque art of the Po River plain, where the vital weight of the figures and the physical volume of the bodies were preferred to the Byzantin transcendental style and to the mystical space of the golden background”.

From the demolished Church of Saint Eutropius, the stone was found in the home of Corso Mazzini, which today bears the number 64, where the church once stood.

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