Art of the Embriachi, Annunciation, Crucifixion, Agony in the Garden, and Saints. In the doors, two angels praying

Art of the Embriachi,
Annunciation, Crucifixion, Agony in the Garden, and Saints. In the doors, two angels praying

Art of the Embriachi, Annunciation, Crucifixion, Agony in the Garden, and Saints. In the doors, two angels praying
XV century, inlays in bone, ivory, and ebony, 66X4.5 cm, Inv. n. 202

The portable altar piece, with inlays in bone, ivory, and ebony, in the form of a triptych and still in a somewhat Gothic style, is attributed to the well-known workshop of Baldassarre of the Embriachi, who worked in Florence from 1370-1380 and then in Venice until about 1430.

The work, which came from the Cappuccini Convent in Faenza, can be traced back to about 1400. During these years, the workshop was already operative in Venice, where Baldassare had moved for political reasons between 1391 – 1393 and where he died in 1406.

Beginning with the door to the left, above there is a depiction of the Annunciation, set in a humble little room and, below, there are two saints: St. James the Great and St. Anthony the Abbot. The central door bears a depiction, above, of the scene of the Crucifixion and below that of the Baptism of Christ; finally in the door to the right there is, above, the Agony of Christ in the Garden; below there are St. Michael the Archangel and deacon saint (perhaps St. Stephen).

The other important aspect of this triptych in Faenza is the decoration on the exterior of the doors. There are two profiles of angels in monochromatic hues painted on a red background.

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